War Crimes of the Union Army

 Chronicles of the American Inquisition

“We believe in a war of extermination…”

    Brig. Gen. James H. Lane[1]

Anyone familiar with the History of Western Civilization has heard of the Inquisition. Before and during the 30 Years War, the Vatican openly called on the armies of confederate nations in the Holy Roman Empire to exterminate their Religious and Political enemies. Could it be that the most powerful Protestant lands in the world, which also included a Catholic element in Louisiana that had suppressed the Jesuits in the late 18th Century and the early 19th Century, received such treatment?   This is a question to be answered in a following blog but for now, is it not at least curious that the Son of General Sherman was a Jesuit?[2]

The following will be a catalogue of the war crimes against the people of the South. Cisco’s War Crimes Against Southern Civilians provides much more and in fuller detail but I have focused on the most grievous and most documentable online.

1. Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion by Mr. Charles Stewart, Series I-Volume 25

 

General order of Rear-Admiral Porter, V. S. Navy, regarding depredations committed by the fleet on unarmed citizens.

General Order,                                                                        U. S. Mississippi Squadron,

No. 158.                                                                      Flagship Black Hawk, January 18,1864.

“I regret to say that I have been deeply mortified in one or two instances by the conduct of persons in charge of some of the gunboats, the most prominent of whom are Acting Master F. T. Coleman and Acting Ensign S. B. Coleman, of the Mound City. These two officers, in the absence of their gallant commander (who has led the Mound City through battles that will render her name historic and which have reflected much honor and credit on the brave crew), have committed offenses against the laws of justice and humanity which call for the severest punishment the law can inflict. Lost to all sense of propriety and regardless of all orders, they have both indulged in a system of petty pillaging and outrages on unarmed individuals, and have converted the vessel of which they had charge into an instrument of tyranny and aversion to the people, instead of upholding that nice sense of honor, propriety, and discipline by which the Navy has been known since it first had an existence…

David D. Porter.

Bear-Admiral, Comdg. Mws. Squadron[3]

2. Maj. Gen. Benjamin Butler, General Order No. 28,

New Orleans, May 15, 1862.

“As the officers and soldiers of the United States have been subject to repeated insults from the women (calling themselves ladies) of New Orleans in return for the most scrupulous non-interference and courtesy on our part, it is ordered that hereafter when any female shall by word, gesture, or movement insult or show contempt for any officer or soldier of the United States she shall be regarded and held liable to be treated as a woman of the town plying her avocation.”[4] [5]

3. The St. Louis Massacre, May 10, 1861.[6]

4. The Burning of Charleston,

Our Women in the War.”: The Lives They Lived; the Deaths They Died by

The Weekly News and Courier, Charleston, S.C, 1885,

“At the given signal, in rushed Howard’s lawless 15th corps, to wreak their vengeance upon an unprotected town of women and children. But again an over-ruling Providence and merciful Father said, “Thus far shalt thou go, and no farther,” or what would have remained of us?

ON CAME THE FLAMES,

driven by a fierce wind and augmented by the cruel torches of the fiends, who unrelentingly applied them to building ‘after building, as they rushed from block to block in their fury. The streets were bright as day, and the air was rent with the screams and cries of distress, mingled with infant wails, and the demon yells of the tormentors. Who can picture that scene, except to compare it with the lower regions?”[7]

Theft

5. Tennessee civilians in the Nashville area were forced out of their homes under Brig. Gen. Robert B. Mitchell.[8]

6. The Plantation of Mrs. William Harding of Belle Meade, Tennessee was invaded by Yankee troops and pillaged.[9]

7. The Pillaging of Fredericksburg, Virginia. When confronted with the crimes of his men Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard stated, “Soldiers are not supposed to be angels.”[10] http://dotcw.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/The-sacking-of-Fredericksburg-December-12.jpg

8. The 21st Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, under Captain Gates set fire to a house filled with women in it destroying these people’s lives.[11]

9. The Conduct of Federal Troops in Louisiana during the invasions of 1863 and 1864 by Henry Watkins Allen says of the Union pillaging of Dasincourt Borel of New Iberia and the horse taken from him by the Yankees,

“It is the only means of support I have left me,’ said he ‘and if I do not get it, I cannot support my family. My children will starve.’…the horse is no more your property than the rest [said Banks]…Louisiana is mine. I intend to take everything.”[12]

10. Elise Tharbodeaux of the Vermillion, witnessed a mass execution of hundreds of cattle in his yard performed by Union troops.[13] An act of theft and cruelty; not only to the animals but to the people who needed them for sustenance.

11. Even after the Union’s formal withdrawal, people in Louisiana still suffered under their hand. The Civil War in Louisiana by John David Winters says,

“In September and October the jayhawkers came from hiding and resumed their regime of rape, murder and pillage. A new home guard was raised in November but the jayhawkers, now led by a slave named Bernard continued their reign of terror.”[14]

12. The War of the Rebellion, Series 1, Volume 38, Part 5,

“Headquarters Calvary Division

Near Roswell, July 6, 1864-7 p.m.

Major-General Sherman,

My impression is that Johnston will make no attempt on this flank, but that his cavalry has gone to his left. He will try to keep his communications -with the source of his supplies westward. All information from citizens and his acts in this vicinity lead to this belief. His cavalry instead of falling back to the fords and bridges in this locality crossed on the bridges, &c, with the infantry. Everything is taken out of this country; the grain cut by the rebel soldiers and hauled off. All citizens of property also have left. There were some line factories here, one woolen factory, capacity 30,000 yards a month, and has furnished up to within a few weeks 15,000 yards per month to the rebel Government, the Government furnishing men and material. Capacity of cotton factory 216 looms, 191,086 yards per month, and 51,666 pounds of thread, and 4,229 pounds of cotton rope. This was worked exclusively for the rebel Government. The other cotton factory, one mile and a half from town, I have no data concerning. There was six months’ supply of cotton on hand. Over the woolen factory the French flag was flying, but seeing no Federal flag above it I had the building burnt. All are burnt. The cotton factory was worked up to the time of its destruction, some 400 women, being employed. There was some cloth which had been made since yesterday morning, which I will save for our hospitals (several thousand yards of cotton cloth), also some rope and thread. I have just learned that McCook is near the paper-mills, on Soap Creek, and I may not take up the position first proposed in this letter. I will try to disguise the strength of my command. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

K. GAEEAED, Brigadier- General, Commanding”[15]

And what became of these 400? They were shipped away, finally arriving in Louisville, KY.

“Only think of it; Four hundred weeping and terrified Ellens, Susans, and Maggies transported in springless and seatless army wagons, away from their lovers and brothers of the sunny South, and all for the offense of weaving tent-cloth and spinning stocking yarn…

Cincinnati Daily Commercial, 19 July 1864”[16]

 

13. The Women of the South in War Times, 

 

“IN SHERMAN’S SWATH TO THE SEA

The utter destitution of the women and children of Georgia in the wake of Sherman’s army is well illustrated by the narrative of one of them—Mary A. H. Gay. The authenticity of her narrative has been vouched for by Joel Chandler Harris, of “Uncle Remus” fame.

From her home near Decatur, Georgia, Miss Gay set out for Atlanta, in 1864, on an errand of mercy. She arrived at the latter city after Sherman had entered, and she saw the despoiling of the houses not already destroyed. Having obtained a pass, she went from Atlanta southward to Jonesboro, taking with her carefully secreted and much needed clothing for the Confederate soldiers.

On the way she saw and afterwards graphically described the appearance of “the entire Southern population of Atlanta, and that of miles around as they were dumped out upon the cold ground without shelter.” In her description of the scene as she passed through, she wrote: “An autumnal mist or drizzle was slowly but surely saturating every article of clothing upon them. Aged grandmothers upon the verge of the grave, tender girls in the first bloom of young womanhood, and little babes not three days old in the arms of sick mothers, were driven from their homes and all thrown out upon the cold charity of the world.”[17]

14. Philip Sheridan’s pillaging of Virginia. The War of the Rebellion, Series 1, Volume 43, Part 2,

Woodstock, Va., October 7,1864—9 p. m.

(Received 9th.)

Lieut. Gen. U. S. Grant,

Commanding Armies of the United States:

…I have destroyed over 2,000 barns, filled with wheat, hay, and farming implements; over 70 mills, filled with flour and wheat; have driven in front of the army over 4[,000] head of stock, and have killed and issued to the troops not less than 3,000 sheep. This destruction embraces the LurayValley and Little Fort Valley, as well as the main valley. A large number of horses have been obtained, a proper estimate of which I cannot now make. Lieut. John B. Meigs, my engineer officer, was murdered beyond Harrisonburg, near Dayton. For this atrocious act all the houses within an area of five miles were burned. Since I came into the Valley, from Harper’s Ferry up to Harrisonburg, every train, every small party, and every straggler has been bushwhacked by people, many of whom have protection papers from commanders who have been hitherto in this valley. From the vicinity of Harrisonburg over 400 wagon loads of refugees have been sent back to Martinsburg; most of these people were Bunkers, and had been conscripted. The people here are getting sick of the war; heretofore they have had no reason to complain, because they have been living in great abundance. I have not been followed by the enemy up to this point, with the exception of a small force of rebel cavalry that showed themselves some distance behind my rear guard to-day…

P. H. SHERIDAN,

Major- General[18]

15. Staunton Vindicator, October 21st, 1864,

“Unable to vanquish Robert E. Lee on the battlefield Grant has turned his arms against the women and children of our land.”

16. Pillage at Clinton, GA,

“SHERMAN AT CLINTON.

Correspondence of the Macon Telegraph & Confederate.

CLINTON, Ga., Saturday, Nov. 26

I snatch a moment to advise you of the destruction committed by the enemy here. Many of us are utterly ruined — hundreds of our people are without anything to eat — their stock of cattle and hogs are killed; horses and mules with wagons are all taken off — all through our streets and commons are to be seen dead horses and mules — entrails of hogs and cattle killed, and in many instances, the hams only taken — oxen and carts taken away, so that we are not able to remove this offensive matter — our school-houses and most of the churches burned — Capt. BOMERS’ beautiful residence in ashes, together with everything of his that could be found, destroyed. He was from home. Atrocities most henious were committed — MORGAN’s tannery, with a quantity of Government leather, destroyed, and his family, like many others, deprived of all food — clothes taken off the backs of some of the contrabands, and female servants taken and violated without mercy, by their officers, and in some instances when they were reared as tenderly as the whites. But I cannot recapitulate in detail the many outrages — residence of J. MCGRAY, Dr. BLOUNT, J.H. BLOUNT and others burned.”[19]

Rape

 17. Men from the Ninth Regiment of New York Volunteers attempted to rape a woman in Fredericksburg, VA.[20]

 18. The Nineteenth Regiment Illinois under Col. J. B. Turchin committed mass theft, pillage, mass rape and murder.

“General Orders

No. 39.

Headquarters Army Of The Ohio,

In Camp, Huntsville, Ala., August 6, 1862.

I. By a general court-martial, which convened at Athens, Ala., on the 7th day of July, 1862, pursuant to Special Orders, No. 93, of July 5, 1862, and which was adjourned to Huntsville, Ala., by Special Orders, No. 108. of July 20, 1862, from the Headquarters Army of the Ohio, and of which Brig. Gen. J. A. Garfield, D. S. Volunteers, is president, was arraigned and tried Col. J. B. Turchin, of the Nineteenth Regiment Illinois Volunteers:

Charge 1.—Neglect of duty, to the prejudice of good order and military discipline.

Specification.—In this, that the said Col. J. B. Turchin, of the Nineteenth Regiment Illinois Volunteers, being in command of the Eighth Brigade, Army of the Ohio, did, on or about the 2d day of May, 1862, march the said brigade into the town of Athens, State of Alabama, and having had the arms of the regiment stacked in the streets did allow his command to disperse, and in his presence or with his knowledge and that of his officers to plunder and pillage the” inhabitants of said town and of the country adjacent thereto, without taking adequate steps to restrain them.

Among the incidents of said plundering and pillaging are the following:

A party entered the dwelling of Milly Ann Clayton and opened all the trunks, drawers, and boxes of every description, and taking out the contents thereof, consisting of wearing apparel and bed-clothes, destroyed, spoiled, or carried away the same. They also insulted the said Milly Ann Clayton and threatened to shoot her, and then proceeding to the kitchen they there attempted an indecent outrage on the person of her servant girl.

A squad of soldiers went to the office of R. 0. David and plundered it of about. $1,000 in money and of much wearing apparel, and destroyed a stock of books, among which was a lot of fine Bibles and Testaments, which were torn, defaced, and kicked about the floor and trampled under foot.

A party of this command entered a house occupied by two females, M. E. Malone and S. B. Malone, and ransacked it throughout, carrying off the money which they found, and also the jewelry, plate, and female ornaments of value and interest to the owners, and destroying and spoiling the furniture of said house without cause.

For six or eight hours that day squads of soldiers visited the dwelling house of Thomas S. Malone, breaking open his desk and carrying off or destroying valuable papers, notes of hand, and other property, to the value of about $4,500, more or less, acting rudely and violently toward the females of the family. This last was done chiefly by the men of Edgarton’s battery. The plundering of saddles, bridles, blankets, &c, was by the Thirty-seventh Indiana Volunteers.

The same parties plundered the drug store of William D. Allen, destroying completely a set of surgical, obstetrical, and dental instruments, or carrying them away.

The store of Madison Thompson was broken open and plundered of a stock of goods worth about $3,000, and his stable was entered, and corn, oats, and fodder taken by different parties, who on his application for receipts replied that they gave receipts at other places, but intended that this place should support them,” or words to that effect.

The office of J. F. Lowell was broken open and a fine microscope and many geological specimens, together with many surgical instruments and books, carried off or destroyed.

Squads of soldiers, with force of arms, entered the private residence of John P. Malone and forced open all the locks of the doors, broke open all the drawers to the bureaus, the secretary, sideboard, wardrobes, and trunks in the house, and rifled them of their contents, consisting of valuable clothing, silver-ware, silver-plate jewelry, a gold watch and chain, &c, and in the performing these outrages they used coarse, vulgar, and profane language to the females of the family. These squads came in large numbers and plundered the house thoroughly. They also broke open the law office of said Malone and destroyed his safe and damaged his books. A part of this brigade went to the plantation of the above named Malone and quartered in the negro huts for weeks, debauching the females and roaming with the males over the surrounding country to plunder and pillage.

A mob of soldiers burst open the doors and windows of the business houses of Samuel Tanner, jr., and plundered them of their contents, consisting of sugar, coffee, boots and shoes, leather, and other merchandise.

Very soon after the command entered the town a party of soldiers broke into the silversmith shop and jewelry store owned by D. H. Friend, and plundered it of its contents and valuables to the amount of about $3,000.

A party of this command entered the house of R. S. Irwin and ordered his wife to cook dinner for them, and while she and her servant were so engaged they made the most indecent and beastly propositions to the latter in the presence of the whole family, and when the girl went away they followed her in the same manner, notwithstanding her efforts to avoid them.

Mrs. Hollinsworth’s house was entered and plundered of clothing and other property by several parties, and some of the men fired into the house and threatened to burn it, and used violent and insulting language toward the said Mrs. Hollinsworth. The alarm and excitement occasioned miscarriage and subsequently her death.

Several soldiers came to the house of Mrs. Charlotte Hine and committed rape on the person of a colored girl and then entered the house and plundered it of all the sugar, coffee, preserves, and the like which they could find. Before leaving they destroyed or carried oft” all the pictures and ornaments they could lay their hands on.

A mob of soldiers filled the house of J. A. Cox, broke open his iron safe, destroyed and carried off papers of value, plundering the house thoroughly, carrying off the clothes of his wife and children.

Some soldiers broke into the brick store of P. Tanner & Sons, and destroyed or carried off nearly the entire stock of goods contained there, and broke open the safe and took about $2,000 in money and many valuable papers.

A party of soldiers, at the order of Captain Edgarton, broke into an office through the windows and doors and plundered it of its contents, consisting of bedding, furniture, and wearing apparel. Lieutenant Berwick was also with the party. This officer was on the ground.

The law office of William Bichardson, which was in another part of the town, was rifled completely and many valuable papers, consisting of bonds, bills, and notes of hand, lost or destroyed.

The house of J. H. Jones was entered by Colonel Mihalotzy, of the Twenty-fourth Illinois Volunteers, who behaved rudely and coarsely to the ladies of the family. He then quartered two companies of infantry in the house. About one hour after Captain Edgarton quartered his artillery company in the parlors, and these companies plundered the house of all provisions and clothing they could lay their hands on, and spoiled the furniture and carpets maliciously and without a shadow of reason, spoiling the parlor carpets by cutting bacon on them, and the piano by chopping joints on it with an axe, the beds by sleeping in them with their muddy boots on. The library of the house was destroyed, and the locks of the bureaus, secretaries, wardrobes, and trunks were all forced and their contents pillaged. The family plate was carried off, but some of the pieces have been recovered.

The store of George R. Peck was entered by a large crowd of soldiers and stripped of its contents, and the iron safe broken open and its contents plundered, consisting of $940.90 and $4,000 worth of notes.

John Turrentine’s store was broken into by a party of soldiers on that day, and an iron safe cut. open belonging to the same and about $5,000 worth of notes of hand taken or destroyed. These men destroyed about $200 worth of books found in said store, consisting .of law books, religious books, and reading books generally…

The court finds the accused as follows:

Of the specification to the First Charge, Guilty.

Of the First Charge, Guilty.”[21]

And how was Turchin punished? Well Abraham Lincoln thought it fit to promote Turchin to Brigadier General.

20. In Aiken, South Carolina, the Confederacy met an old Baptist Pastor,

“leaning against a fence post for support. ‘My daughter,” he sobbed. ‘A bunch of Yankees raped her-they just left here.’ The [Confederate] troopers charged down the road and quickly overtook the party of foragers. ‘Boys, I know why you do this, but I had nothing to do with it.’ Said one wounded Federal as he begged for his life. The Confederates spared him but executed the others.” [22]

21. WAR CRIMES AGAINST SOUTHERN CIVILIANS by Walter Cisco page 152 (Chapter on South Carolina),

“Confederate brigadier general James Chesnut was informed by Wheeler’s cavalrymen of a crime they discovered that was far worse. The home of a family identified as the “M.’s” was found plundered. A party of seven Federals had come upon only Mrs. M and her teenaged daughter at home. They tied up the mother and each then proceeded to rape the daughter. By the time Confederates arrived, the girl was dead and the mother was out of her mind. The Yankees were overtaken on the road by the Southern troopers, who shot them down, cut their throats, and left the bodies with a sign that read, “THESE ARE THE SEVEN.”

Against Southern Blacks

22. The War of the Rebellion, Official Records, Series 3, Volume 3,

“Pope’s Plantation, Saint Helena Island, May 13, 1862. Major-General Hunter,

Commanding Department of the South:

General: It seems important to advise you of the scenes transpiring yesterday in the execution of your order for the collection and transportation of the able-bodied colored men from the islands to Hilton Head. The colored people became suspicious of the presence of the companies of soldiers detailed for the service, who were marching through the islands during the night. Some thought the rebels were coming and stood guard at the creeks. The next morning (yesterday) they went to the fields, some, however, seeking the woods. They were taken from the fields without being allowed to go to their houses even to get a jacket, this, however, in some cases, being gone for by the wife. The inevitableness of the order made many resigned, but there was sadness in all. As those on this plantation were called in from the fields, the soldiers, under orders, and while on the steps of my headquarters, loaded their guns, so that the negroes might see what would take place in case they attempted to get away…On some plantations the wailing and screaming were loud and the women threw themselves in despair on the ground. On some plantations the people took to the woods and were hunted up by the soldiers. The school at Eustis was a scene of confusion, the children crying, and it was found of no use to carry it on…

Edward L. Pierce,
Special Agent Treasury Department[23]

 

Rape

23. The Plantation of Mrs. William Harding of Belle Meade, Tennessee was invaded by Yankee troops who molested the slave women of the plantation.[24]

24. The Rape of Athens. At the home of Milly Ann Clayton, of AthensAlabama, Union soldiers under Col. Turchin,

“insulted the said Milly Ann Clayton and threatened to shoot her, and then proceeding to the kitchen they there attempted an indecent outrage on the person of her servant girl…Squads of soldiers, with force of arms, entered the private residence of John P. Malone A part of this brigade went to the plantation of the above named Malone and quartered in the negro huts for weeks, debauching the females and roaming with the males over the surrounding country to plunder and pillage…Several soldiers came to the house of Mrs. Charlotte Hine and committed rape on the person of a colored girl and then entered the house and plundered it of all the sugar, coffee, preserves, and the like which they could find.”[25]

25. Cisco states,

“Butler’s discipline of his own men often seemed curiously lax. For example, on June 10, 1862, Cpl. William M. Chinock raped an African-American woman named Mary Ellen De Riley. Found guilty by a military court for the crime of rape, Chinock was reduced from corporal to private and fined forty dollars.”[26]

These and many other crimes prompted Jefferson Davis to state,

“Now therefore, I Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, and in their name do pronounce and declare the said Benjamin F. Butler to be a felon deserving of capital punishment. I do order that he be no longer considered or treated simply as a public enemy of the Confederate States of America but as an outlaw and common enemy of mankind, and that in the event of his capture the officer in command of the capturing force do cause him to be immediately executed by hanging; and I do further order that no commissioned officer of the United States taken captive shall be released on parole before exchange until the said Butler shall have met with due punishment for his crimes.”[27]

26. The War of the Rebellion, Series 1, Volume 15,

“Headquarters First Brigade, Grover’s Division,

In camp on Rayon Baruff, beyond 

Washington, La., April 27, 1863. 

“Sir: In compliance with Special Orders, No. 100,1 have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of this brigade from the time it left Baton Rouge until its arrival in Opelousas…

This brigade encamped on the evening of the engagement, April 14, 1863, near the scene of the action. Next morning it marched in pursuit of the enemy, and at night encamped near IndianVillage. Next day it marched to New Iberia. The scenes of disorder and pillage on these two days’ march were disgraceful to civilized war. Houses were entered and all in them destroyed in the most wanton manner. Ladies were frightened into delivering their jewels and valuables into the hands of the soldiers by threats of violence toward their husbands. Negro women were ravished in the presence of white women and children. These disgusting scenes were due to the want of discipline in this army, and to the utter incompetency of regimental officers.

…WILLIAM DWIGHT, Jr.,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Brigade[28]

27. Rape at Clinton, GA,

“SHERMAN AT CLINTON.

Correspondence of the Macon Telegraph & Confederate.

CLINTON, Ga., Saturday, Nov. 26

I snatch a moment to advise you of the destruction committed by the enemy here. Many of us are utterly ruined — hundreds of our people are without anything to eat — their stock of cattle and hogs are killed; horses and mules with wagons are all taken off — all through our streets and commons are to be seen dead horses and mules — entrails of hogs and cattle killed, and in many instances, the hams only taken — oxen and carts taken away, so that we are not able to remove this offensive matter — our school-houses and most of the churches burned — Capt. BOMERS’ beautiful residence in ashes, together with everything of his that could be found, destroyed. He was from home. Atrocities most henious were committed — MORGAN’s tannery, with a quantity of Government leather, destroyed, and his family, like many others, deprived of all food — clothes taken off the backs of some of the contrabands, and female servants taken and violated without mercy, by their officers, and in some instances when they were reared as tenderly as the whites. But I cannot recapitulate in detail the many outrages — residence of J. MCGRAY, Dr. BLOUNT, J.H. BLOUNT and others burned.”[29]

28. Andy Brice,

“By instint, a nigger can make up his mind pretty quick ’bout de creed of white folks, whether they am buckra or whether they am not. Every Yankee I see had de stamp of poor white trash on them. They strutted ’round, big Ike fashion, a bustin’ in rooms widout knockin’, talkin’ free to de white ladies, and familiar to de slave gals, ransackin’ drawers, and runnin’ deir bayonets into feather beds, and into de flower beds in de yards.”[30]

29. Sexual Misbehavior In the Civil War: A Compendium by Thomas P. Lowry (Which is chalked full of incidents like these),

“In October 1865, a ‘colored girl,’ Sarah, who worked at Murray Robinson’s plantation, was beaten and raped at Rowe’s Pump. Her assailant was Oscar Mendelsohn of the 54th New York Veteran Volunteers…’He caught me by the breast, threw me down and ravaged me for a quarter of an hour.’ ”[31]

30. At the South Carolina Bryce family home, Union troops overwhelmed the house. They kicked out the Bryce family but the blacks received a far worse treatment.

“South Carolina author William Gilmore Simms described some of the more horrific aspects of the night, noting first the rapes of black women by the soldiers and then their mistreatment of white women and even the dead…

Regiments, in successive relays, subjected scores of these poor women to the torture of their embraces”.[32]

My black friend, was it really the Southern Plantation owner that raped your Great Grandmother? And by the way, this little quote may shed some more light on the subject of abuse of slaves in the South:

Abraham Lincoln, Speech on the Repeal of the Missouri Compromise-Speech at Peoria, Illinois

October 16, 1854,

“We know that some southern men do free their slaves, go north, and

become tip-top abolitionists; while some northern ones go south, and become most cruel slavemasters.”[33]

I wonder how many cruel slave masters in the South were really Yankees?

Assault

31. The War of the Rebellion, Official Records, Series 1 Volume 34, Part 2,

“Maj. Gen. W. S. Rosecrans:

General: A negro, Sam Marshall, who resides in Leavenworth, reports to me that yesterday he went over to Platte City, Mo., to get his children, who he was told would be allowed to come away free. The children were at a Mr. Green’s. Sam went in daylight with a team driven by a white man, and made no demonstration of insolence or disrespect to anybody. He was arrested by the military commander, one Capt. David Johnson, of the Missouri militia, who talked to him about the impropriety of his conduct. The sheriff, one Jesse Morris, also lectured him and told him the captain would send a guard to take him away, as it was a wonder he was not killed. About a dozen of the soldiers did escort him about half a mile out of PlatteCity, where they tied him to a tree, and stripping him to the waist lacerated his back with a cowskin, the marks of which Sam. will carry to his grave. They told him they were “introducing him to the Paw Paw militia,” and that if Colonel Jeimison would come to PlatteCity they would treat him in the same way. The militia were dressed in Federal uniform and armed with revolvers. Two of them Sam. knew. They are young Chinn and a young Cockerel. Sam. is a quiet, well-behaved negro, whose tears and sorely lacerated back seem to attest the truth of his statement.

…S. R. CURTIS,

    Major- General.[34]

 

32. The War of the Rebellion, Official Records, Series I, Volume 42,

“New Berne, N. C, September 1, 1864.

Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler,

Comdg. Department of Virginia and North Carolina: 

General: The negroes will not go voluntarily, so I am obliged to force them. I have sent seventy-one and will send this afternoon about 150. I expect to get a large lot to-morrow. I have done all that could be done, but I am not as fortunate as you expected me to be. I shall keep working.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully,

Fred Martin,

Captain and Aide-de-Camp.”[35]

Theft

33. Army Life of an Illinois Soldier by Charles Wright Wills,

“Most of the mischief is done by the advance of the army, though, God knows, the infantry is bad enough. The d—d thieves even steal from the negroes (which is lower business than I ever thought it possible for a white man to be guilty of) and many of them are learning to hate the Yankees as much as our “Southern Brethren” do. The army is becoming awfully depraved.”[36]

34.  Yankee Autumn in Acadiana by David C. Edmonds quotes Rev. James Earl Bradley living west of Opelousas in 1863 when the Yankees invaded his home,

“they entered the house, searched every room and found the only (saddle) on the place. It belonged to Miss Amanda’s deceased brother, but they took it. They examined the cabins, robbed us of our dinner (and robbed) the Negroes too. It was such fun to see big darkie in the cabins daring white soldiers to search him.”[37]

35. Benjamin George, a black slave who lived near Samuel Schumulen, a man invaded by Yankee criminals, tried to help Schumulen. For this the Yankees robbed him, and shot him in the leg, crippling him for life.[38]

36. The War of the Rebellion, Series 1, Volume 34, Part 1,

“Headquarters District of West Louisiana,

Monett’s Ferry, April 24, 1864…

The destruction of this country by the enemy exceeds anything in history. For many miles every dwelling-house, every negro cabin, every cotton-gin, every corn-crib, and even chicken-houses have been burned to the ground ; every fence torn down and the fields torn up by the hoofs of horses and wheels of wagons. Many hundreds of persons are utterly without shelter. But for our prompt attacks Natchitoches would have been burned to the ground, and also the little village of Cloutierville, both of them having been fired in several places.

R. Taylor

Major-General

[Confederate-DS]”[39]

CAN WE NOW SEE WHY THE WHITE MEN IN THE SOUTH AFTER THE CIVIL WAR WERE ANGRY AND BITTER? OF COURSE THEY WERE. THEY HAD EVERY RIGHT TO BE.

LET ME ASK YOU A QUESTION MY SOUTHERN BROTHER: ARE YOU ANGRY AFTER READING THIS? WELL THEN LET ME ASK YOU ANOTHER QUESTION: WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO ABOUT IT?

Are you going to sit back while your homeland has been raped in more ways than one for the last 150 years? The white men around you are ready for action and the Jesuits are going to harness that anger into the creation a coming white Fascist party. We have to prevent this.  We don’t need Fascism. We don’t need infiltrated organizations like the KKK. And we certainly don’t need the Republican Party. They are the ones who invaded us down here in the first place! They are just as atheist and communist as the left. We need the South to rise again. We need to base this on the foundations of the Protestant Reformation. The Solemn League and Covenant needs to be re-affirmed. In the coming blogs I am going to discuss who is to blame. These are the conclusions I will come to:

  1. The Vatican and its Jesuit Order and Military cult, the Knights of Malta
  2. The extension of the Vatican in Protestant lands: The Masonic Lodge.

In the coming years Alex Jones and Jesse Ventura, or people associated with them are going to popularize that old Nazi mantra that the Jews are to blame for everything: The Jews are the Zionists and the Jews are the international bankers. That will be their platform and in some degree they are right. However, the Jews have a master in Rome. Remember what the Jews said in John 19:15,

“Away with Him, away with Him, crucify Him!” Pilate said to them, “Shall I crucify your King?” The chief priests answered, “We have no king but Caesar.”

Study the Vatican’s Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem and ask yourself who ultimately benefits from Zionism.

Lastly, don’t hate the black people. They suffered right along with us. Don’t fall for these coming white Fascist regimes. Forget about the KKK, forget about the Neo-Nazi groups, and forget about the Republican Party. Join a Confederate Organization. Join the Sons of Confederate Veterans or the League of the South and get active. We don’t need Corporate Fascism, we need that old Agrarian-Southern-Patriarchal way of life in order to break free from the Pope’s NWO.


[3]Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion by Mr. Charles Stewart, Series I-Volume 25: http://books.google.com/books?pg=PR7&dq=%22have+committed+offenses+against+the+laws+of+justice+and+humanity%22&id=xzfZ-m5_FmoC&ots=OgaloYRa8p#v=onepage&q&f=false

[8] See Nashville: The Occupied City by Walter T. Durham as quoted by Walter Cisco in War Crimes Against Southern Civilians.

[9] Ibid., 180

[10] The Fredericksburg Campaign by Francis Augustín O’Reilly, pg. 124

[12] Pg. 40

[13] Cisco, pg. 93-94

[20] The Ninth Regiment by Lt. Matthew Graham,385-386: http://archive.org/stream/ninthregimentnew01grah#page/384/mode/2up

[22] Cisco, pg. 146-147; FN: Sherman‘s March by Burke Davis pg. 151-152

[24] Nashville: The Occupied City by Walter T. Durham, 180

[26] Cisco, pg. 67-68

[27]ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Richmond [Va.], December 24, 1862.

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 111: http://www.history.umd.edu/Freedmen/pow.htm

[30] Slave Narratives, South Carolina Narratives, Part 1: http://archive.org/stream/slavenarrativesv18912gut/18912.txt

[37] Pg. 248

[38] Cisco, pg. 95