James Ussher’s Annals of the World. This book details the Conservative and Literal rendering of the genealogies  of the Bible and includes a history of  the world that corresponds to recorded history and not according to the speculations of an indemonstrable scientific theory.

BTW, I have been thinking through something. How does empiricism help, with regard to history? When you are reading a history book you are not seeing and hearing the events happening so how could history be a problem for Scripturalists?  People say that empiricism is required for history but how often does one actually see and hear a historical event that appears in the historical record? How often do Historians see and hear the historical events they debate? Probably never. I have never read a single event in a book that I experienced first hand. Second, Clark mentioned in his Festschrift that Scripture gives us the significance of an event, not the event itself. When I have mentioned this to people they seemed puzzled by it. I have been chewing on this and I think I understand what he is saying. What he is saying is that Scripture gives us Historiography not history. That is, it gives us the method to interpret the history, not the record itself.  Thoughts?